Welcome to My Blog

April 1st, 2009

Welcome! Thanks for visiting my blog, Disrupt IT.  And, no, disrupt it does not just refer to my behavior!  Disrupt IT refers to all of the new disruptive technologies available as marketing tools today.  Why are they disruptive?  They continue to “disrupt” traditional media plans as the way we interact, communicate, engage and even purchase, continually evolves along with technology.  Disrupt ITis dedicated to exploring these disruptive technogies and media and how they can be used to make the world a better place.   Why make the world a better place?  Why not!!  You can read more about why I started this blog in the post Who Really Cares?, but the bottom line is that we can all make a difference, and using disruptive technologies we can make an even bigger impact working together.  Every gift to charitable causes not only benefits the recipients, but also benefits the givers and the world we live in. So, join in the conversation and help make the world a better place!

 

Author: Categories: Uncategorized Tags:

NTC 2010

April 10th, 2010

It’s time for the Nonprofit Tech conference and this year it is here in Atlanta! Check it out at http://www.nten.org/ntc.

If you’re around, please attend my session on Saturday morning from 10:30 -12 and the Omni CNN Center. The session is hosted by our friends at the Georgia Center for Nonprofits and the topic is how to improve your fundraising efforts through integrated marketing.

Session Description:

Join us for a discussion on how to improve your fundraising efforts through integrated marketing. It’s important to understand the changes taking place today in both disciplines, and how these shifts are reshaping the way we approach both fundraising and marketing. In this workshop, a seasoned veteran with 15+ years experience as a nonprofit leader and business executive will outline exactly what you need to do to be successful at both.


Kicking off 2010 in Atlanta

January 21st, 2010

Well, it is now official…I even have a shiny new State of Georgia Driver’s License this month to prove it! Why is it your driver’s license photo always makes it look like you just got out of prison, or maybe should go to prison? And no, I am not posting the image of it in this post or anywhere else :)

2010 is here, or has been for a few weeks now, and a great New Year it is looking to be. For one, as noted in the title, I was able to kick it off in Atlanta. Even if just barely – the movers unloaded us on New Year’s eve! But we were officially here, which is just where my family and I wanted to be on Jan 1st, in our new home town. Atlanta is a great town. We are excited to explore the city and the surrounding areas. The first weekend landed us at the Aquarium, which was amazing. If you come to town, I recommend it!

Additionally, Grizzard Communications is an outstanding company to kick off the New Year with! Grizzard, a leading nonprofit response marketing and fundraising agency with offices in Atlanta and Los Angeles, contacted me with a great opportunity in the later part of last year. While the reasons to join the Grizzard team, a group with 90 years of experience and an impressive client base, were many, one stood out in particular. As the Vice President of Digital Marketing, spearheading delivery of our digital services and offerings, I have the opportunity to expand proven digital strategies to a portfolio of clients that work in the US and across the globe to help those in need, look to cure disease, protect animals, are there when disasters hit and bring the services to our communities that make them a better place. And that is just too hard to pass up. Plus, partnering with these groups to build digital programs that build engagement and loyalty faster than arguably any other media ever before, provides a great attraction and a challenge. And I love it! Arm your supporters with the digital tools they need, and give them a chance to take a more direct role in changing the world, and they will be your fundraisers, advocates, supporters, volunteers, adding reach and dollars to your cause in a way not possible before.

My time at Grizzard has confirmed that this great opportunity was also the perfect fit. Over the past months, it has been impressive to see the talent within the organization. Not only have I made some great new friends, but enjoy working with what is proven to me again and again to be leading talent as client strategies are developed and delivered. Branding, Research & Analytics, Creative, Account Management, Strategic Planning, Media Buying, Integrated & Digital Marketing, Proprietary Technologies, Campaign Delivery. Working in tandem to deliver results. Results that allow leading nonprofits to go further, do more, help more. How can that not end up making the world a better place?

I hope you are off to a great 2010 as well. And if I can help your program out, don’t hesitate to contact me at:

C. Eric Overman
VP, Digital Marketing
Grizzard Communications Group
229 Peachtree Street, #1400
Atlanta, GA 30303
eric.overman@grizzard.com
800-241-9351

Lights. Camera. Help!

July 31st, 2009

FREE TICKET AVAILABLE, SEE BELOW!

Time for ACTION – Lights. Camera. Help.

This weekend marks the first annual Lights. Camera. Help. awards festival, and you need to check this out!  Lights. Camera. Help. is the premiere film festival for non-profit and cause-driven organizations.

Numerous organizations are taking part in this annual event by submitting films and videos directly related to advancing their cause,  to be reviewed by a panel of judges.  The films and videos will gain recognition by being considered the best in one of several distinct categories.

I wish I knew about this group before I met and became friends with founder David J. Neff at the AMA Nonprofit Marketing Conference two weeks ago.  David was honored with a Social Media award by the AMA for his outstanding work in the field.  Lights. Camera. Help. is just one of many ways he is contributing to Online, Video and Social Media.   If I had known, I would have submitted videos from Operation Smile for consideration!  Well, we will be there next year!  

Not only is this festival a cool idea (I know, if you say “cool” it is a sure sign you are not!), but it’s importance in furthering video as a nonprofit marketing tool can’t be understated.  Video is simply a crucial cornerstone for almost any successful and rounded nonprofit marketing strategy, and an event that recognizes the best will help further our ability to spread the word, empower supporters and raise funds.  Not only will Lights. Camera. Help. highlight outstanding work in the field, they will offer support to nonprofits on how to effectively use video to further their missions.  Additionally, proceeds of the festival go to the winning nonprofit.

  

 If you can get to Austin this weekend, check it out.  A three day pass is available for only $15.  Unfortunately, I can’t make it in this weekend, but I do have a ticket to give away for free.  Just contact me and let me know you want to go, and it is yours!!!  If you can make, find David and say hi.  He is a great guy.
This festival is the first of its kind in the nation and reflects the spirit of Austin, a prominent city in the non-profit, cause-driven and activism communities. These organizations, along with filmmakers, will use the festival to spread the word about their cause, develop a community of followers, and expand the film-for-a-cause genre.

This year The Lights. Camera. Help. team viewed over 140 nonprofit and cause-driven films. One of these lucky organizations will take home all of the proceeds from these events so get your tickets today!  Pre-judging has narrowed the competition down to 19 groups:
Mills to Manhattan – Best Friends Animal Society
Survivors of Dating Abuse – Break the Cycle
Manifesto – Lance Armstrong Foundation
Family Portraits – Jewish Family Services of Seattle
Give 5 – United Way Capital Area
Reality, Mobility, Independence – Wheelchair Foundation
Think Pink Lemonade Stand – Women Playing for T.I.M.E.
Think Before You Speak – Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network
Aid to Artisans – Aid to Artisans
Fowl Play – Mercy for Animals
Fighting Goliath: Texas Coal Wars – Texas Clean Air Cities Coalition
Red Ink – We Are Family
Perfect Match – Michigan Humane Society
Time Bomb – charity:water
Impacting the Future – National Underground Railroad Freedom Center
Tale of Two Brothers – Los Angles Urban League
Thoughts in a Hijab – Reel Grrls
The Perfect Parent PSAs – AdoptUSKids
Art From The Streets – Art From The Streets

So, head out this weekend if you can.  Otherwise, we’ll post the winning video soon!

Thank You AMA & AMA Foundation (aka Shameless Self Promotion…)

July 20th, 2009

Just returned from a great trip to Chicago where I was honored to receive the American Marketing Association and the American Marketing Association Foundation Nonprofit Marketer of the Year for 2009! Wow, what an honor and a privilege. Especially considering the outstanding field of nominees this year and the talented folks that won special awards for Social Media and Special Projects, David J. Neff and Anne Bergquist. Read all about it below:

AMA & AMAF Honor the Recipients of the
2009 Nonprofit Marketer of the Year Awards

(CHICAGO, July 16, 2009) – The American Marketing Association (AMA) and the American Marketing Association Foundation (AMAF) honored three nonprofit marketing leaders at its Nonprofit Marketing Conference in Chicago, IL, on July 16, 2009. Eric Overman, Operation Smile, received the Nonprofit Marketer of the Year Award, and Anne Bergquist, YMCA of Metro Chicago, and David Neff, American Cancer Society High Plains, received the Special Marketing Initiatives and Social Media subcategory awards, respectively. The AMA/AMAF Nonprofit Marketer of the Year Awards honor extraordinary leadership and achievement in the field of nonprofit marketing.

Eric Overman is Director of Online Communities and Social Media at Operation Smile (www.operationsmile.org), an international medical charity dedicated to mobilizing a world of generous hearts to heal children’s smiles and transform lives across the globe.

Since joining the organization in 2006, Eric has launched its first Online and Interactive department, promoted integrated marketing programs, and introduced new technologies to increase donor engagement and empower supporters to also become advocates and fundraisers. These efforts generated 30 percent annual online revenue growth and resulted in email list growth of 500 percent. Eric is currently launching branded online communities and leading the charge to integrate social media into the marketing mix, as well as deploying an internal social business software platform to enhance global communications.

Eric’s blog, Disrupt IT (www.ericoverman.com), explores the impact of the emerging disruptive technologies and media on the nonprofit world. Eric lives in Virginia Beach, VA, with his wife, Karen, and two children. He serves as president-elect of the Hampton Roads American Marketing Association and holds an MBA from William & Mary’s Mason School of Business.

Anne Bergquist, Vice President of Brand Management and Marketing for the YMCA of Metro Chicago (www.ymcachgo.org), joined the Y in 2002. She is responsible for the Y’s brand image through its corporate marketing program that drives annual membership revenue in excess of $28 million from more than 120,000 members at 19 branches across Chicagoland.

In addition to the corporate marketing strategy, Anne directs the development and execution of the marketing plans at each YMCA membership branch, enabling customization with consistent brand identity using guerrilla marketing, advertising, and promotional tactics at the local level. As a result of her efforts, from 2003 to 2006 the Y grew membership revenue by $6 million and increased retention by 11 percent.

During her tenure at the Y, Anne restructured the corporate marketing department to function as an in-house agency serving 19 membership branches, six Human Services programs, and four resident camps. She also developed a comprehensive graphic design/copy template system for membership marketing, retention, and fundraising materials, ensuring maximized internal resources and consistent brand identity across the association. In addition, Anne developed and directed the Y’s first image awareness campaign tied to the YMCA’s 150th anniversary in 2008.

Anne has a BA in American Studies from the University of Notre Dame. She and her husband, Kent, reside in Chicago.

David J. Neff is the Director of Web, Film and Interactive Strategy for the American Cancer Society’s High Plains division (www.cancer.org) and is also the Executive Director of Lights. Camera. Help (www.lightscamerahelp.com).

In his capacity at the American Cancer Society, David directs all Web and interactive strategies and online properties for six states in addition to managing the division’s eRevenue strategy, social networking/media strategy, and online community strategy. As the executive director of Lights. Camera. Help, he is working to start the world’s first nonprofit-focused film festival.

David is a two-time recipient of a Futuring and Innovations grant, which he used to create C-Tools and SharingHope.TV (www.sharinghope.tv). C-Tools was the first PDA software tool for the prevention of cancer developed by the American Cancer Society, and SharingHope.TV is the nonprofit world’s first totally user-generated content Web site. In 2009, the Austin American Statesman recognized David as one of the top 25 Social Media People in the state of Texas.

David earned his BS in Public Relations from the University of Texas with a minor in Business from the McCombs School of Business. He currently lives in Austin, TX.

About the AMA/AMAF Nonprofit Marketer of the Year Awards
In addition to honoring the Nonprofit Marketer of the Year, the AMA and AMAF wanted to recognize two additional marketers whose skills and accomplishments are particularly relevant for today’s changing economy and technology with the Special Marketing Initiatives and the Social Media awards. With the help of The Nonprofit Times (award presenting sponsor), the AMA Foundation promoted the awards and received close to 100 nominations. Winners were selected by a six person committee consisting of members of the 2009 AMA Nonprofit Marketing Conference Committee and Advisory Council, AMA Foundation Board members, and a representative from The Nonprofit Times–all of whom are leaders and experts in the field of nonprofit marketing. Judges rated nominees on three criteria: vision and leadership, strategy, and results.

The AMA/AMAF Nonprofit Marketer of the Year Awards Committee was chaired by Tom Abrahamson, Managing Director & Principal, Lipman Hearne, AMAF Board member, and former AMA Board member. The committee is as follows:

Tom Abrahamson (Chair), Managing Director & Principal, Lipman Hearne;
Jay Aldous, Chief Marketing and Communications Officer, U.S. Fund for UNICEF;
Lisa Chernick, Executive Director, American Marketing Association Foundation;
Cynthia Currence, President and CEO, Currence & Associates;
Meme Drumwright, Associate Professor, Advertising, University of Texas at Austin; and
John McIlquham, President, The Nonprofit Times.

The AMA Foundation will announce the call for nominations for the 2010 Nonprofit Marketer of the Year Awards in the winter of 2010.

About the American Marketing Association
The American Marketing Association is the largest marketing association in North America. It is a professional association for individuals and organizations involved in the practice, teaching and study of marketing worldwide. It is also the source that marketers turn to every day to deepen their marketing expertise, elevate their careers, and, ultimately, achieve better results. American Marketing Association members are connected to a network of experienced marketers nearly 40,000 strong.

American Marketing Association offers highly acclaimed Training Series, professional conferences and Hot Topic events focused on the immediate needs of marketers, as well as trends shaping the future. American Marketing Association’s website, MarketingPower.com, is the everyday connection to marketing data, articles, case studies, best practices and a robust job bank. Additionally, the American Marketing Association is the source for the field’s top magazines and journals, including Marketing News. Through local and collegiate chapters, American Marketing Association members are connected with the best people and the best practices. For more information on the American Marketing Association please visit www.marketingpower.com.

About the American Marketing Association Foundation
The American Marketing Association Foundation maximizes marketing for the betterment of society. This is accomplished by:

Investing in the growth and use of nonprofit and social marketing knowledge;
Supporting appropriate community outreach efforts; and
Acknowledging academic and practitioner marketing excellence.
The AMAF works in partnerships and other strategic collaborations with the AMA, AMA chapters, marketing practitioners and academics, and scores of voluntary and community organizations. For additional information about the AMAF and its programs or to make a contribution, please visit www.themarketingfoundation.org.

Sneak Preview: 140 Smiles to Launch at TwtrCon 2009.

May 28th, 2009

Get Ready!!! This weekend, Operation Smile is launching 140 Smiles (in 140 characters) campaign via Twitter. The excitment starts at the May 30th launch event in downtown San Francisco and continues on through TWTRCON the next day, with great prizes for those who help the most children, including a Grand Prize trip to New Zealand (donated by Entirely Kiwi).  You can follow the campaign on twitter as it unrolls with the hashtag #140Smiles.

Operation Smile medical volunteers repair childhood facial deformities such as cleft lip and cleft palate. (Disclaimer: I work at Operation Smile, so I’m a bit biased!) A single surgery can take as few as 45 minutes and costs as little as $240. The 140 Smiles campaign is aimed at raising funds for 140 of these reconstructive surgeries. Operation Smile has partnered with TWTRCON, the first Twitter for business conference, and Common Knowledge, an interactive agency for nonprofits, to launch this exciting campaign via social media channels, mainly twitter.

140 Smiles will kick-off Saturday, May 30, 2009, at 7pm at Le Colonial in downtown San Francisco and will be streamed live by Twooting. Also serving as the launch party for TWTRCON 2009, the event will bring together some of the top tweeters to help spread the word about this groundbreaking campaign.

While Common Knowledge and Operation Smile have joined together to produce a Case Study surrounding the use of fundraising via Twitter and Social Media to be released later this summer, the power of Twitter could aready be seen the way this entire campaign and launch event have evolved. This whole campaign is possible in thanks to Operation Smile’s Twitter support base. Twitter friend and supporter Stef Michaels, known by over 500,000 Twitter followers as Adventure Girl (@adventuregirl) stepped up and not only got Operation Smile and TWTRCON connected to form this campaign, but this media entrepreneur and travel expert then began lining up great 140 Smiles prizes, including a trip to New Zealand, airline tickets from Virgin America, and mp-3 players with Napster subscriptions! Each day, Stef added to this great event, making it better and better through the help of friends and twitter contacts.

So, how does the campaign itself work? Starting May 30th, supporters can visit www.140smiles.org to participate. Donations can be made by individuals or you can start a Twitter Smile Team to hit a larger goal. List of teams and donors will be streamed on the website, with a tag cloud illustrating who is helping the most children as the campaign unrolls. Some unique APIs have also been built to allow the website to tweet out on behalf of the donors and teams as they add to their campaign. Campaign promotion will then be targeted to several million twitter users via Twitter, and we’ll start spreading the word during the launch event and throughout TWTRCON the next day . So get your tweets ready!  Plus, the 140Smiles website will do the tweeting for you if you prefer!

Learn more via the Twooting interview with Renee Hamilton (Operation Smile’s Social Media Strategist), Jeff Patrick (President, Common Knowledge) and me.  Check it out!

If you’re going to be in San Fran this weekend shoot me a message and join the fun.  Otherwise, follow the action on 140Smiles.org with the live twooting broadcast starting Saturday, May 30 at 7pm. 

I’ll be sure to update on the progress!

Hope to see you there!

 

Author: Categories: Social Media, Social Web Tags: ,

The Future is Now for Social Web

May 13th, 2009

In his recent Forrester Report and blog post, The Future of Social Web, Jeremiah Owyang divided the future of the Social Web into five distinct “eras” which will unfold over the next five years.  It is clear the paradigm of how consumers communicate online, both with each other and the organizations and brands they support, is undergoing a major shift.  This breakdown provides not only a great understanding of the common question on where social web is heading, it also makes it clear that the time to add these tool sets into your planning is now.  Understanding and keeping up with this shift is crucial for organizations that don’t want to get left behind!

Five Eras

Let’s take a look at the Five Eras.  I’m going to borrow this summary from destinationCRM.com :

  1. The era of social relationships: Beginning in the mid-1990s, people signed up for online profiles and connected with their friends to share information.
  2. The era of social functionality:As it exists today, social networking is more than just a platform for “friending,” but one that can support a broader array of what Owyang calls “social interactive applications.” However, identities are essentially disconnected silos within individual sites.
  3. The era of social colonization:By late 2009, technologies such as OpenID and Facebook Connect will begin to break down the barriers of social networks and allow individuals to integrate their social connections as part of their online experience, blurring the lines between networks and traditional sites.
  4. The era of social context:In 2010, sites will begin to recognize personal identities and social relationships to deliver customized online experiences. Social networks will become the “base of operation for everyone’s online experiences.”
  5. The era of social commerce: In approximately two years, social networks will be more powerful than corporate Web sites and CRM systems, as individual identities and relationships are built on this platform. Brands will serve community interests and grow based on community advocacy as users continue to drive innovation in this direction.

It is important to note that while their are five distinct eras, they actually overlap on the timeline, all playing out over the next five years (see chart below).  Here in mid-2009 we are well into the Era of Social Functionality and entering the Era of Social Colonization.  This is exciting as we start to see integration opportunities between the multiple online networks we are part of.  You will be able to control your online profile(s) and track your various networks with common tools, merging your networks together from a user experience point of view.  We are quickly reaching the point where social web will be the driving force for online experience, and organizations need to take head.  It is also clear that with this medium fully maturing over the next 3-5 years the time to incorporate the social web into your planning is now.  It can often take three years to launch and build a successful online community to the point of critical mass, and if you don’t engage your constituents now, it may be too late in 3-5 years, or at least much more difficult.  The noise might be too loud to get their attention by then.

 

 

Timing Of The Five Overlapping Eras

Shift in Online Experience

The chart below provides a breakdown of how this fundamental shift in the user web experience will play out for consumers, brands, social networks and other media.  For one, social web will begin to dominate the online user experience.  Consumers and supporters will move towards working with peers and within communities to become directly engaged with the brands and organizations they support, while purchasing and donation decisions will be largely driven by peer information, with commerce will take place right in the social online experience.  Consumers, donors and supporters continue to grow their expectations for more and better engagement opportunities with the organizations and brands they support.  Brands will not only provide these opportunities, but continue to derive more information on product development and direction from the social web.  Social Web will also begin to play a major role in the way corporate communications and public relations is delivered.

  Chart from "The Future of the Social Web," by Jeremiah Owyang, Forrester Research: The Evolution of the Social Web Affects Consumers, Brands, and Social Networks

 

So, where do we go from here?

If you haven’t already, now is the time to prepare for the social web and consider how online communities can support your brand or mission.  I’m going to borrow again from destinationCRM.com , because I fully agree with the recommendations they offer:

  • Don’t Hesitate: These changes are coming at a rapid pace, and we’re in three of these eras by end of year. Brands should prepare by factoring in these eras into their near term plans. Don’t be left behind and let competitors connect with your community before you do.
  • Prepare For Transparency:  People will be able to surf the web with their friends, as a result you must have a plan.  Prepare for every web page and product to be reviewed by your customers and seen by prospects –even if you choose not to participate.  
  • Connect with Advocates: Focus on customer advocates, they will sway over prospects, and could defend against detractors. Their opinion is trusted more than yours, and when the power shifts to community, and they start to define what products should be, they become more important than ever.
  • Evolve your Enterprise Systems: Your enterprise systems will need to connect to the social web. Social networks and their partners are quickly becoming a source of customer information and lead generation beyond your CRM system.  CMS systems will need to inherit social features –pressure your vendors to offer this, or find a community platform.
  • Shatter your Corporate Website: In the most radical future, content will come to consumers –rather than them chasing it– prepare to fragment your corporate website and let it distribute to the social web. Let the most important information go and spread to communities where they exist; fish where the fish are.

 

 Quick Video:

Jeremiah published the video on his blog, an interview with him by Blake Cahill from Visible Technologies.  It provides a summary of the five eras in case you don’t want to read the above! 

       

Social Mapping to Build your Social Media Strategy

April 10th, 2009

The second workshop I attended at the Web 2.0 Expo in San Fran was a great presentation by Mark Silva and Susan MacDermid from Real Branding.  During this interactive session we looked at matching your target audience’s technographics (similar to demographics, but groups users based on their level of interaction with social media) to the social media markteting and/or toolset you plan on using to engage your consituents.  It’s a great process to go through as you get ready to plot or improve your own social media marketing plan and/or online community strategy.

First, let’s take a look at technographic breakdown and some handy tools to help you hone in on what might be the best offerings for you target audience.  Then, let’s apply them to a few markets I’m getting ready to target and see how it works.  Not surprisingly, our friends at Forrester have some great resources to get started on their Groundswell website.

Social Technographics.  Forrester’s Technographic Ladder provides the groups web users into.:  Creators, Critics, Collectors, Joiners, Spectators and Inactives.  The brief slideshow below explains each of these “rungs” (categories) on the Ladder:

View more presentations from jbernoff.

Here’s slide 10 from Forrester’s presentation with explanation of each category to refer back to as we look at the different technographics of the age and sex breakdowns available.

 technographics-ladder12

So now that you have an understanding of the various categories, let’s apply this to social media planning.  A quick way to do this is with the profile tool from Forrester’s Groundswell.

Let’s start with the United States.  You can also pull information on Europe and certain other countries.  I’m going to go a little crazy with the charts here, so bare with me.  Here are all age range demographics in the US for both male and female users, so we can track the differences and match up available social media tools to each group.  This first chart represents how adult web users (18 & older) in the United States interact with Social Media.  

us_all2

When planning strategy, match your target market, donors, customers, etc., to the age and sex breakdowns offered in the tool.  Then you can match their preferred type of engagement to the toolset you will either need to offer or reach them through to resonate with that group.  For example, if you are building an online community or planning a Social Media campaign targeted to young adults aged 18-24 you can pull the following two charts:

us_male_18to24

us_female_18to24

While the spectators categories is tops in all age groups, let’s look at what stands out.   First, the overwhelming majority like to be joiners by maintaining profiles and visiting social network sites.   They are also almost twice as likely as the general web user, males slightly more than females, to be creators.  Look for opportunities to let this group publish blogs, create their own web pages, upload videos and artwork that they create, and tell their own stories.   Third, this age group likes to interact by critiqueing, rating and commenting, so be sure to offer these abilities in your plan.  Online social networks like Facebook and YouTube also provide good outlets to reach these groups with Social Media campaigns.

OK, here are the other breakdowns you can pull:

 us_male_35-44 us_female_35to44

us_male_45to54

us_male_45to541

us_female_45to54

us_male_55

us_female_55

 So, we can definately see several trends – the younger you are, the more active you are in social media.  This may be no surprise, even with the rapid adoption among 45+ age group of social media.  However, there are also several trends we can see regarding the types of media you prefer to interact with at different ages, and perhaps life stages.

The joiners group falls in half after age 24, but still maintains strength (and is growing) through age 45.   And the desire to rate and comment content as part of the critics group remains strong across all age group, and is one of the highest points of involvement over those 45+ years old.

Finally, here is a short list of some of the opportunities for Social Map marketing.  You likely know of many more, and the list continues to evolve.  These also represent several related toolsets to use in building an online community, including blogs, wikis, ratings, video sharing, widgets, social networking, friend following, microblogging, IM, presence, and virtual collaboration tools.

Social Networking

  • Facebook
  • MySpace
  • Hi5
  • Gather
  • LinkedIn
  • Orkut
  • Plaxo

Photo Sharing

  • Flickr
  • Picassa
  • Photobucket
  • Snapfish
  • Slideshare

Blogging

  • WordPress
  • Podcasting
  • Tumblr
  • Typepad

Microblogging

  • Twitter
  • Yammer
  • Facebook (new feature offers similar microblogging functionality)

Bookmarking:

  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • Blogmarks
  • StumpleUpon
  • Ma.gnolia

Video Sharing

  • Youtube
  • Google Video
  • Livecast
  • Yahoo Video

 Data from Forrester Research Technographics® surveys, 2008. For further details on the Social Technographics profile, see groundswell.forrester.com.

Designing Social Interfaces

April 2nd, 2009

Attended a great workshop Tuesday morning at the Web 2.0 Expo about designing social interfaces.  Christian Crumlish from Yahoo! and Erin Malone with Tangible ux are two of the leading experts in this field and had a lot of great information to share.  There latest book with O’Reilly Media, Designing Social Interfaces: Principles, Patterns, and Practices for Improving the User Experience, is coming out this summer, but a sneak preview will be available soon at O’Reilly Roughcuts.

Check out their presentation below from the workshop provides some great information:

View more presentations from Erin Malone.

If you really want to dive deep into social user experience design patterns, Christian and Erin have led the creation of amazing knowledge base:  Designing Social Interfaces.com.

You can find them both on twitter. Christian is @mediajunkie and Eric is @emalone.  If you are curious about designing social interfaces I suggest you follow these two!

Twitter Crazy!

April 1st, 2009

A couple of weeks back Nielsen released some new numbers on member communities.  As indicated by the title, Tweet Smell of Success, twitter was the fastest growing community (based on US traffic) from February 2008 – February 2009, growing at a whopping 1382%! 

And don’t think it is driven by youngsters just because it is new and social!  Over 41% of the tweeters are age 35-49, with another 25% over age 55. 

Marketers will certainly need to take head here, as businesses continue to grapple with ways to successfully bring social media in the fold.  Get out there, listen to what’s being said about you, and twitter might be a good place to start.  One easy way to get some great use from twitter is to monitor the dialogue about your brand and engage those already talking about you!  It can be a great customer service tool.

As the report summarizes:  “It will be interesting to watch the evolution of Twitter as it continues to gain momentum. In an unstable economy, it might prove to be an economical and important part of an employer’s marketing strategy that helps to keep consumers aware of and connected to their brand.”

But, dont’ worry – I’m still going to print up my t-shirt that says “Tweet This”:)